Skip to main content

About your Search

KDTV (Univision) 1
WFDC (Univision) 1
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
franklin roosevelt started it in 1933. president obama arrived at the capitol just a few minutes ago. he will soon be announced to the crowd and seated. here are the highlights of today's program. vice president joe biden will take the oath of office first administered by supreme court associate justice sonia sotomayor. >> and then the crowd will be treated to a musical selection by james taylor and then chief justice john roberts will administer the presidential oath of office to mr. obama. that comes just before noon eastern time. now, following the president's inaugural address will be another musical selection. this one by kelly clarkson, and a poem by richard blanco. reverend luis leon will give the benediction followed by beyonce. she's going to sing the national anthem, she had a baby, and she's going to perform at the super bowl. >> not to be upstaged, hampsto pearson is at the capitol. what are you seeing? >> beyonce got a much bigger cheer than i did. it was one of the more electric moments that just happened a few minutes ago when she and jay-z came in. you just missed the int
, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are spared, the less they try do the usually better they stand up. >> do you agree, less is more is this. >> yeah. and shorter is better. that helps. when richard nixon was wrikts his second inaugural, he look
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
it a second time so now a third time, tomorrow a fourth time. you'd thing it was franklin roosevelt. >> he is president. >> that's right. he had practiced so many times for that moment. we know how he felt. so, matt, tomorrow, what will you be looking for? what's the first thing you want to be -- you want to make sure you're sitting and watching. >> i think the first thing you watch for when both the president and the first lady come out of church. we sort of get the first glimpse as they do that but in the end what we all want to hear what's going to be in his inaugural address, how will he address a country incredibly divided and went through a rough and tumble campaign cycle and struggles in congress. what is he going to say to congress and the country? many inaugurals have gone down very well. some have not been well. >> abc's jon karl covers the white house and the president for us and, of course, we all are waiting for that inaugural address, but coming up to this inauguration day, the president struck quite a confrontational tone with congress. >> reporter: he sure has. also feels p
of office four times as president, franklin roosevelt. >> he was elected four times. >> obama doesn't get to be president for that long. >> bunt this up. when we redid it four years ago, a couple days later, accident have to do it but they just did it just to be on the safe side is that why? >> here's why politics come into t as they thought about whether to redo the oath, they were thinking, look, this is a president who's been accused of not being born in the united states. people are really looking for reasons to question his authentici authenticity. so they thought, look, let's get rid of this problem at the beginning. let's redo the oath there is the photograph there in the mac room in the white house, done at 7:00 in the evening on january 21st and they eliminated the problem but one of the reasons they felt to deal with the problem is they felt his political opposition, they might file a lawsuit they would be in court. they didn't want to have that sort of uncertainty. >> did it, got over with and that is that he will be in the blue room today administering the oath at the white ho
this. she became a liberal spokesperson for the roosevelt family. when franklin roosevelt couldn't go as far as he wanted to, he would say, listen to my wife and that's where my heart lies. in another case where it can backfire hillary clinton in the first clinton administration. >> a crucial role michelle obama played giving that speech which was very well received. >> she helps to humanize him and provide that behind had scenes look at who he is and what he's trying to accomplish. she can relate to people on a level of shared experiences. she's a working woman. she understands raising kids and juggling work and family. and when people can hear from her in that sort of long form format and really have that conversation with her, it really electroifies the room and i think that's what helped changed the dialogue in 2008. >> in that speech that she gave at the convention, i think people forgot, you know, democrats were really a little bit down. she got out there and when she spoke, that wasn't just one of the best speeches of a first lady, that was one of the best speeches in american
for the fourth time since franklin roosevelt. >> jennifer: amazing. >> john: very true. that's a piece of trivia that won't be matched any time soon. >> jennifer: while we're watching the inaugustral procession, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
pocos demócratas que tiene un segundo mandato, después de franklin d. roosevelt, pero también es una imagen de la virtud de su mandato de hace 4 años, donde, creo que has comentado antes, desaparece el factor étnico, es realmente el presidente de los estadounidenses. >>> y realmente la cuestión racial queda a un lado, o trata de quedar a un lado. >>> así es, eso es muy claro. >>> veamos >>> gracias muchísimas gracias, vicepresidente biden, presidente de la corte suprema, miembros del congreso de estados unidos, distinguidos invitados, y conciudadanos cada vez que nos reunimos para la toma de posesión de un presidente, somos testigos de la fortaleza de nuestra constitución, afirmamos la promesa de nuestra democracia lo que une a nuestra nación, no es el color de nuestra piel o el origen de nuestros nombres o nuestra fe, lo que nos hace excepcionales, lo que nos hace estadounidenses, es nuestra fidelidad a una idea articulada en una declaración que se hizo hace más de 200 años, consideramos que estas verdades son evidentes por sí mismas, que todos los hombres son creados ig
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)